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Medieval Maps

The links here will direct you to publicly available sources for these maps. The actual course used higher resolution versions of these, held on the course Blackboard site.

  • 6th C. BCE Babylonian world map (link)
  • 3th C. Eratosthones world map (reproduction) (link)
  • 6th C. Cosmas Indicolpeustus maps from Christian Topography (link)
  • 9th C. T-O marginal maps in Isidore of Seville’s Etymologies (link)
  • 11th C. Beatus maps (link)
  • 1050 Cotton map (link)
  • 1120s Lambert of St. Omer maps from Liber Floridus (link)
  • 1154 Muhammad Al-Idrisi’s Tabula Rogeriana (link)
  • 1190 Sawley Map (link)
  • 1200 Vercelli Map (link)
  • 13th C. Ebstorf Map (link)
  • 1250s Matthew Paris’s maps (link)
  • 1260 Psalter map (link
  • 1285 Hereford map (link)
  • 1300 portolan charts (link to an example)
  • 1320s Opicinus of Canistris’s moral maps of the Mediterranean (link)
  • 1331 Vesconte world map (link
  • 1375 Catalan Atlas (link)
  • 1400s Eversham map (link)
  • 1400  alleged) Vinland map (link)
  • 1415 De Virga map (link)
  • 1448 Walsperger map (link)
  • 1450 Catalan-Estense map (link)
  • 1450 Fra Mauro map (link)
  • 1466 Petrus Roselli map (link
  • 1476 Bologna Ptolemy map (link
  • 1482 Germanus Cosmographia (link
  • 1489 Albino de Canepa map (link
  • 1491 Cusa Eichstätt map (link
  • 1500 Juan de la Cosa map of the New World (link
  • 1507 Waldseemüller map (link)
  • 1513 Piri Reis map (link)
  • 1516 Waldseemüller map (link)
  • 1540 Münster Europa Prima Nova Tabula (link)
  • 1604 Kunyu Wangouo Quantu / Matteo Ricci world map (link

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